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Ayen | 16 | Froshie | Lasallian | AB Multimedia Arts

Status: In love with my best friend~

This tumblr page is for my more personal text posts. So yun... Friends? :)

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crush | college | dear future boyfriend | personal | challenge

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11 August 11

I really should be studying Reled and Comski for tomorrow… Pero wala talaga ako sa mood. Pero pagdating Algebra kailangan na kailangan kong mag-aral.

Reblogged: letmehaveyouback

5 August 11

Reblogged: itsirah

31 July 11

danbuenaventura:

Behind the scenes video of Ed Westwick’s campaign shoot for Penshoppe.

Video by Jason Magbanua

Reblogged: danbuenaventura

Posted: 5:12 AM

Seryosong usapan. Gusto kitang mahalin, kaso hindi pwede. Ayokong saktan ang sarili ko sa ganitong klaseng paraan. Pero mahal kita, promise.

27 July 11




Lumapit sa ‘min si Kuya may dala-dalang “I love you” na nakalagay sa cartolina… Mga kasing laki ng isang sticky note tapos kinausap niya kami “Mga ate, baka naman po pwedeng makahingi ng favor? Pakibigay naman po nito sa girlfriend ko mamaya pagka-pasok niya dito sa music room? Salamat *sabay super cute na smile*“ Tapos mga 5pm siguro sabi sa ‘min nung isang ate pumunta daw kami sa second floor para ibigay sa girlfriend ni kuya yung note na inabot niya sa ‘min… KAYA NAGHINTAY KAMI! Hanggang sa marinig namin yung voices na kumakanta ng “Minsan lang kitang iibigin” ata yun… SA GITNA NG MABINI BUILDING!!! WTF?! Super kilig ang lahat! Tapos nung inaabangan namin sabay sabi nung isa naming kasama sa Voices na naka-akyat na daw. Kaya ayun, akyat kami ni Pao simula second floor hanggang 6th floor! Pagdating namin ng Music room andun na sila… Inabot namin yung note tapos kumanta kami ng Happy Birthday. Tapos pumasok si Kuya sa storage room, kinuha yung bouquet ng roses tsaka yung gitara niya. After ng Happy Birthday tumahimik kami tapos sabi ni Kuya “Alam ko alam mo ‘tong kantang ‘to kasi lagi mo ‘tong pinapakinggan…” Tapos kumanta siya ng Runaway ng The Corrs! Ay! Grabe! Sobrang kilig ang lahat sa nangyayari. Hindi ko na alam kung anong words pa ang dapat kong gamitin para lang ma-express ang kakiligan na nararamdaman ko!

EFFORT KUNG EFFORT TO!

Lumapit sa ‘min si Kuya may dala-dalang “I love you” na nakalagay sa cartolina… Mga kasing laki ng isang sticky note tapos kinausap niya kami “Mga ate, baka naman po pwedeng makahingi ng favor? Pakibigay naman po nito sa girlfriend ko mamaya pagka-pasok niya dito sa music room? Salamat *sabay super cute na smile*“ Tapos mga 5pm siguro sabi sa ‘min nung isang ate pumunta daw kami sa second floor para ibigay sa girlfriend ni kuya yung note na inabot niya sa ‘min… KAYA NAGHINTAY KAMI! Hanggang sa marinig namin yung voices na kumakanta ng “Minsan lang kitang iibigin” ata yun… SA GITNA NG MABINI BUILDING!!! WTF?! Super kilig ang lahat! Tapos nung inaabangan namin sabay sabi nung isa naming kasama sa Voices na naka-akyat na daw. Kaya ayun, akyat kami ni Pao simula second floor hanggang 6th floor! Pagdating namin ng Music room andun na sila… Inabot namin yung note tapos kumanta kami ng Happy Birthday. Tapos pumasok si Kuya sa storage room, kinuha yung bouquet ng roses tsaka yung gitara niya. After ng Happy Birthday tumahimik kami tapos sabi ni Kuya “Alam ko alam mo ‘tong kantang ‘to kasi lagi mo ‘tong pinapakinggan…” Tapos kumanta siya ng Runaway ng The Corrs! Ay! Grabe! Sobrang kilig ang lahat sa nangyayari. Hindi ko na alam kung anong words pa ang dapat kong gamitin para lang ma-express ang kakiligan na nararamdaman ko!

EFFORT KUNG EFFORT TO!

Reblogged: letmehaveyouback

22 July 11
pelikula:

For the Love of Indie: The Cinemalaya SpecialWords and Illustration by Jansen Musico (with apologies to Rob Cham)
Seven years ago, I was asked by a professor to see a film that was screening at the Cultural Center of the Philippines. I was taking up Gender Studies at that time, and the movie I was made to watch was a short called Babae by Sigrid Bernardo. It was a surprisingly funny thesis tackling all aspects of womanhood. Fittingly, it was paired up with Aloy Adlawan’s Roomboy, a tale of love, poverty, and sexuality contained in a vacuum of hopelessness spawned by the lonely streets of Manila. Back then, there were no separate screenings for shorts, just double-features.
It was only after my viewing that I found out that the films were a part of a festival. It was the first of its kind in the country, or so I was informed. It was Cinemalaya—a title which fused the words “cine” or film and “malaya” or freedom. It was, at that time, an answer to a problem.
In the early 2000s, the local movie industry was already entering a new phase which was mostly populated by movies and sequels based on old worn-out love songs and flicks purposely crafted to launch the careers of the reality show winners from both ABS-CBN and GMA, the big studio behemoths. During that period, it seemed as though our already weakening film industry was already waving the white flag against Hollywood in terms of creativity, novelty, and culture. Though a few noticeable blips such as Mark Meily’s Crying Ladies and Rory Quinto’s Anak hit the screens, it still seemed that Filipino film was doomed to flat line. It needed a jolt, and fast.
The emergence of Cinemalaya was a slow one. I remember a time where I didn’t even have to queue for tickets, and I always had to force someone to accompany me to see a film. It was a hard sell. Why would people flock to see a low-budget movie by a no-name director? Harry Potter was out, and so were the new Batman and Mr. & Mrs. Smith. Why would people risk their time and money on a local indie?
A lot has definitely changed since then. I would like to believe that the once-small festival was able to create an audience which continues to grow each year. It has become a tradition. Cinemalaya has become a home for those who love homegrown films, be they aspiring auteurs, frustrated storytellers stuck in the wrong job, or the masses of moviegoers who have gotten tired of the norm. Cinemalaya has opened doors to many great talents, most of whom have been recognized from all over the world. But most importantly, the festival has opened the eyes of so many people through the many brilliant stories, which have thankfully been told because they’ve been given a chance to see the light of day.
For the love of indie, we at Pelikula will be having a Cinemalaya special, with posts and reviews that will come out during the next few days. If you haven’t had the chance of experiencing Cinemalaya first hand, the screening days are from July 15 to 24 at the CCP and Greenbelt theaters. Ticket prices range from P75 for students to P150. Make sure to buy them now, because they’re selling fast. Support independent Filipino films.

pelikula:

For the Love of Indie: The Cinemalaya Special
Words and Illustration by Jansen Musico (with apologies to Rob Cham)

Seven years ago, I was asked by a professor to see a film that was screening at the Cultural Center of the Philippines. I was taking up Gender Studies at that time, and the movie I was made to watch was a short called Babae by Sigrid Bernardo. It was a surprisingly funny thesis tackling all aspects of womanhood. Fittingly, it was paired up with Aloy Adlawan’s Roomboy, a tale of love, poverty, and sexuality contained in a vacuum of hopelessness spawned by the lonely streets of Manila. Back then, there were no separate screenings for shorts, just double-features.

It was only after my viewing that I found out that the films were a part of a festival. It was the first of its kind in the country, or so I was informed. It was Cinemalaya—a title which fused the words “cine” or film and “malaya” or freedom. It was, at that time, an answer to a problem.

In the early 2000s, the local movie industry was already entering a new phase which was mostly populated by movies and sequels based on old worn-out love songs and flicks purposely crafted to launch the careers of the reality show winners from both ABS-CBN and GMA, the big studio behemoths. During that period, it seemed as though our already weakening film industry was already waving the white flag against Hollywood in terms of creativity, novelty, and culture. Though a few noticeable blips such as Mark Meily’s Crying Ladies and Rory Quinto’s Anak hit the screens, it still seemed that Filipino film was doomed to flat line. It needed a jolt, and fast.

The emergence of Cinemalaya was a slow one. I remember a time where I didn’t even have to queue for tickets, and I always had to force someone to accompany me to see a film. It was a hard sell. Why would people flock to see a low-budget movie by a no-name director? Harry Potter was out, and so were the new Batman and Mr. & Mrs. Smith. Why would people risk their time and money on a local indie?

A lot has definitely changed since then. I would like to believe that the once-small festival was able to create an audience which continues to grow each year. It has become a tradition. Cinemalaya has become a home for those who love homegrown films, be they aspiring auteurs, frustrated storytellers stuck in the wrong job, or the masses of moviegoers who have gotten tired of the norm. Cinemalaya has opened doors to many great talents, most of whom have been recognized from all over the world. But most importantly, the festival has opened the eyes of so many people through the many brilliant stories, which have thankfully been told because they’ve been given a chance to see the light of day.

For the love of indie, we at Pelikula will be having a Cinemalaya special, with posts and reviews that will come out during the next few days. If you haven’t had the chance of experiencing Cinemalaya first hand, the screening days are from July 15 to 24 at the CCP and Greenbelt theaters. Ticket prices range from P75 for students to P150. Make sure to buy them now, because they’re selling fast. Support independent Filipino films.

Reblogged: pelikula

30 June 11

Sana sa ‘kin ka naf-fall no? :( Sakit sakit kasi eh. Hay.

28 June 11

Sweet nyo kasi, selos ako. :( Hay.

Posted: 10:39 AM
Posted: 10:34 AM
wimpydrawings:

You can’t wrap love in a box, but you can wrap a person in a hug. So, it’s kinda like a gift too you give to people. It makes them feel better.

wimpydrawings:

You can’t wrap love in a box, but you can wrap a person in a hug. So, it’s kinda like a gift too you give to people. It makes them feel better.

(Source: wimpydrawings)

Reblogged: blithenessie-deactivated2012121

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh